Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography

By Jean H. Baker | Go to book overview

XII
Last Years

Elizabeth Edwards was surprised. For weeks her sister had been impatient to go. Then, in September 1876, when the train to Chicago was leaving the Springfield depot, at the last moment Mary Lincoln had what Elizabeth called a gush of anguish. Embracing her sister, she delivered a sobbing farewell: "I go an exile and alone. Will you not join me in Europe next year?" 1

Since June Elizabeth Edwards had been trying to persuade her sister not to go at all—at least not alone to Europe. No doubt Springfield held memories of a dead husband and sons, but there were other places in the United States that carried no such punishing associations. Both Edwardses had argued with Mary about the need to put an ocean between herself and her son, especially now that Mary Lincoln had control of her money. To the threadbare Edwardses, $8,100 a year (the $3,000 annual government pension, the $3,600 interest on her bonds, and the $1,500 loan repayment by Robert) seemed more than enough for a single woman. Granted, Mary Lincoln could not afford a home of her own; still, her income delivered independence

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • I - First Family: Parkers and Todds 3
  • II - A Second Family 25
  • III - Mary Todd's Lexington 53
  • IV - Springfield Courtship 74
  • V - Domestic Portrait: the Springfield Years 99
  • VI - The Politics of Marriage 130
  • VII - First Lady 163
  • VIII - A Vanishing Circle 208
  • IX - Mrs. Widow Lincoln: the First Years 244
  • X - Exile and Return 281
  • XI - Trial and Confinement 315
  • XII - Last Years 351
  • Notes 371
  • Index 413
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 429

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.