Updike: America's Man of Letters

By William H. Pritchard | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1.
Denis Donoghue, "The Zeal of a Man of Letters", New York Times Book Review, 18 September 1983, 1.
2.
Gore Vidal, "Rabbit's Own Burrow", Times Literary Supplement, 26 April 1996, 3-7.
3.
George J. Searles, ed., Conversations with Philip Roth ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1992), 151.
4.
Quoted by Dean Flower in his useful essay, "John Updike 1932-" in American Writers:A Collection of Literary Biographies, Retrospective Supplement 1, eds. A. Walton Litz and Molly Weigel ( New York: Charles Scribner's, 1998), 317-38.

Chapter 1: First Fruits
1.
Throughout this book, quotations from Updike's poems are from Collected Poems, 1953-1993.
2.
Whitney Balliett, "Writer's Writer", New Yorker, 7 February 1959, 138-42.
3.
John Bayley, The Short Story:Henry James to Elizabeth Bowen ( New York: St. Martin's, 1988), 7.
4.
John Updike, "Franny and Zooey," in Assorted Prose ( New York: Knopf, 1965), 234-39.
5.
In Close Imagining:An Introduction to Literature, Bejamin DeMott has some useful reflections on the story's ending ( New York: St. Martins Press, 1998, pp. 27-33).
6.
John Updike, letter to the author, 5 July 1973.
7.
—, "How Does the Writer Imagine?" in Odd Jobs ( New York: Knopf, 1991), 134-35.

-333-

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Updike: America's Man of Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chronology xi
  • Intorduction the Man of Letters 1
  • One - First Fruits 17
  • Two - The Novelist Takes off 45
  • Three - The Pennsylvania Thing 63
  • Four - Adultery and Its Consequences 117
  • Five - Impersonations of Men in Trouble (1) 145
  • Six - Impersonations of Men in Trouble (ii) 169
  • Seven - Extravagant Flctions 195
  • Eight - The Critic and Reviewer 229
  • Nine - Poet, Memoirist 253
  • Ten - Rabbit Retired 277
  • Eleven - Post-Rabbit Effects 301
  • Notes 333
  • Bibliography 339
  • Index 343
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