Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Critical Companion

By Rubén Pelayo | Go to book overview

6

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967)

Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude was first published on May 30, 1967, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The cover of the first edition, which was never repeated, depicted the silhouette of a galleon floating amid trees against a blue background, which contrasts with three geometric yellow flowers on the lower part of the cover in the foreground (Cobo Borda 101). The novel was an immediate best-seller in Spanish: “not since Madame Bovary [by the French author Gustave Flaubert] has a book been received with the simultaneous popular success and critical acclaim that greeted One Hundred Years of Solitude” (Janes 1991, 13). In three and a half years, the book sold almost a half million copies. As a result, previous books by García Márquez were reprinted in large numbers in the Spanish-speaking world (Vargas Llosa 78). When translations of One Hundred Years of Solitude were published, the novel achieved additional acclaim and honors: in 1969, in Italy, the book won the Premio Chianchiano (Chianchiano Award); the same year, in France, it won the Prix du meilleur livre étranger (Award for best Foreign Book); in 1970, in the United States, it was selected as one of the best twelve books of the year by Time magazine. Although it is difficult to read because of its literary technique, its appeal is that of a classic, which bridges the worlds of academia and popular culture. According to Jorge Luis Borges, the Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story writer, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a book as “profound as the cosmos and capable of endless interpretations” (quoted in Cobo Borda 106).

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Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Board vii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - The Life of Gabriel García Márquez 1
  • 2 - Literary Contexts 15
  • 3 - Leaf Storm (1955) 27
  • 4 - No One Writes to the Colonel (1961) 43
  • 5 - The Short Stories 63
  • 6 - One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) 89
  • 7 - Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1981) 111
  • 8 - Love in the Time of Cholera (1985) 135
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 181
  • Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers 183
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