An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia

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“Account of Charleston, An.” Essay (20,700 words); probably written in the fall of 1930. First published in MW.

HPL’s most exhaustive travelogue of Charleston, written in a flawless recreation of eighteenth-century English. It supplies a comprehensive history of the city from its settlement in 1652 to 1930, followed by a discussion of Charleston architecture and a detailed walking tour. Also included are HPL’s drawings of selected Charleston dwellings and a printed map of Charleston on which HPL has traced his recommended itinerary in red pencil. HPL evidently did not distribute the essay, even among his colleagues (the AMS survives at JHL). In 1936, when H.C.Koenig wished to explore Charleston, HPL condensed and modernized the essay in a letter to Koenig (subsequently revised and published by Koenig as Charleston [1936]; rpt. Marginalia).

Ackerman, Forrest J. (b. 1916). American agent, author, editor. Ackerman has been a science fiction fan since the late ‘20s; he corresponded sporadically with HPL from around 1931 onward. (One letter to him by HPL, dated December 24, 1935, was published in the fanzine Imagination [January 1938].) He instigated a controversy in “The Boiling Point” column (Fantasy Fan, September 1933f.) when he criticized Clark Ashton Smith’s “The Dweller in Martian Depths” (Wonder Stories, March 1933); HPL and his colleagues wrote numerous responses sharply criticizing Ackerman. All responses are reprinted in The Boiling Point (Necronomicon Press, 1985). HPL poked fun at Ackerman in “The Battle That Ended the Century” (1934; with R.H.Barlow), referring to him as “the Effjay of Akkamin,” and “In the Walls of Eryx” (1936; with Kenneth Sterling), where mention is made of “wriggling akmans” and “efjeh-weeds.” He was later editor of Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine (1958–

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