An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia

By S. T. Joshi; David E. Schultz | Go to book overview

H

Haines, Mark. In “Two Black Bottles,” the proprietor of a grocery store in Daalbergen, N.J., who tells the narrator of the strange events surrounding the death of the narrator’s uncle, Johannes Vanderhoof.

“Hallowe’en in a Suburb.” Poem (35 lines in 7 stanzas); probably written in early 1926. First published in the National Amateur (March 1926) (as “In a Suburb”); rpt. Phantagraph (June 1937); rpt. WT (September 1952).

An evocation of the wonders and terrors of Halloween.

Halsey, Allan. In “Herbert West—Reanimator,” the dean of the medical school of Miskatonic University. He opposes Herbert West’s experiments in reanimation, but when he succumbs to typhoid, West resuscitates him with only partial success.

Hammett, [Samuel] Dashiell (1894–1961). Pioneering American writer of “hard-boiled” detective fiction who compiled the horror anthology Creeps by Night (1931), containing HPL’s “The Music of Erich Zann.” HPL, August Derleth, and other colleagues made numerous suggestions to Hammett regarding stories for inclusion in the volume. The anthology was reprinted in the UK as Modern Tales of Horror (1932).

Hardman, ’Squire. In “Sweet Ermengarde,” the owner of the mortgage on the home of Hiram Stubbs, whose daughter, Ermengarde, he hopes to marry. After a succession of adventures, he does so.

Harré, T[homas] Everett (1884–1948). American journalist who assembled the horror anthology Beware After Dark! (1929), containing HPL’s “The Call of Cthulhu,” of which he stated in his introduction: “…in its cumulative awesomeness and building of effect to its appalling finale, [it] is reminiscent of

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