An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia

By S. T. Joshi; David E. Schultz | Go to book overview

J

Jack. The narrator of “The Man of Stone,” who accompanies Ben Hayden on a trip to see the celebrated sculptures of Arthur Wheeler.

Jackson, Henry. In “The Man of Stone,” a man who is treated for tuberculosis near Lake Placid, N.Y., where he hears of the tale that constitutes the narrative of the story and which he passes on to his friend, Ben Hayden, who then goes to investigate the story.

Jackson, Winifred Virginia (1876–1959). Amateur poet living in the Boston area and friend of HPL. HPL was extensively involved with Jackson in amateur journalism during the period 1918–21. He wrote a brief biographical sketch of her, “Winifred Virginia Jordan: Associate Editor” (Silver Clarion, April 1919; as by “El Imparcial”), followed by a lengthy critical analysis, “Winifred Virginia Jackson: A ‘Different’ Poetess” (United Amateur, March 1921); he published several of her poems in his amateur journal, The Conservative; he contributed a poem on Jonathan E.Hoag to her amateur journal, Eurus (February 1918); he served as Official Critic for another journal edited by Jackson, The Bonnet, for whose only known issue (June 1919) he contributed a poem (“Helene Hoffman Cole: 1893–1919: The Club’s Tribute”) and an unsigned editorial (“Trimmings”); he joined her in editing The United Co-operative, three issues of which were published (December 1918, June 1919, April 1921). On a more personal level, he wrote a poem to her (“On Receiving a Portraiture of Mrs. Berkeley, ye Poetess”) on Christmas Day 1920, after receiving her photograph; the title refers to the pseudonym (Elizabeth Berkeley) under which she widely appeared in the amateur press. The poem was evidently not published at the time. By this time HPL had collaborated with her on a story, “The Green Meadow,” based upon a dream by Jackson; later, probably in 1921, they collaborated on “The Crawling Chaos”; both were published as by “Elizabeth Berkeley and Lewis Theobald, Jun.”

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