Contemporary Gay American Poets and Playwrights: An A-to-Z Guide

By Emmanuel S. Nelson | Go to book overview

KENNY FRIES (1960–)

Jeffery Beam


BIOGRAPHY

Kenny Fries was born on September 22, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York, to Donald and Joan Fries, a lower-middle-class Jewish couple. Donald was a kosher butcher, and Joan a housewife. At his birth Fries’s grandmother ran screaming through the hospital yelling, “A freak, a freak, my daughter gave birth to a freak!” referring to the severe deformities of Fries’s lower extremities. At birth “each leg was no bigger than his (father’s) finger; each leg was twisted like a pretzel; each leg had no arch to separate leg from foot” (Body, Remember 6). He spent his first six weeks in the hospital, four of those in an incubator.

Sexual and physical abuse within the family further complicated Fries’s search for self-identity and peace and helped forge his fearlessness as a writer. Nevertheless, his parents’ love and acceptance has aided him throughout his evolution as an artist. A deep connectedness to his father, not without some conflict itself, was critical to his ability to face the difficulties confronting him.

Fries’s childhood details a litany of surgeries that (especially through those by gifted orthopedic surgeon Dr. Joseph Milgram) allowed Fries to walk and to have relatively normal mobility for the first forty years of his life. His physical disabilities and the psychological problems originating from them, familial dysfunctions, and the societal conflicts of being Jewish and gay became the sources of his work as a poet, playwright, memoirist, and national spokesperson for disability issues. Now as he approaches middle age, the physical stress placed on his knees has begun taking its toll. Less mobile but ever forthright in facing hardship, he writes frequently about disability and the emotional illness that has periodically crippled him.

Fries holds an M.F.A. from Columbia University’s School for the Arts (1983)

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Gay American Poets and Playwrights: An A-to-Z Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.