Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Contemporary Gay American Poets and Playwrights: An A-to-Z Guide

By Emmanuel S. Nelson | Go to book overview

TIMOTHY LIU (1965–)

Nikolas Huot


BIOGRAPHY

Born in San Jose, California, of Chinese immigrants, Timothy Liu (Liu Ti Mo) grew up in the Mormon faith and spent two years in Hong Kong for his Mormon mission between 1984 and 1986. He studied at the University of California at Los Angeles and received his B.A. in English at Brigham Young University (BYU) in 1989. While a senior at BYU, Liu published a chapbook of poetry, A Zipper of Haze (1988). Liu went on to attend the University of Houston, where he received his master’s degree in creative writing (poetry) in 1991, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

He was an assistant professor at Cornell College in Iowa for four years and is currently an assistant professor at William Paterson University. Liu has also taught at Hampshire College, at Iowa Summer Writer’s Festival, at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, at the Asian American Writer’s Workshop in New York City, at the University of California at Berkeley, where he was the 1997 Holloway Lecturer, and at the University of Michigan, where he served recently as a visiting professor. Among the honors Liu has received are fellowships at Breadloaf Writers Conference, Ernhardt Memorial Fellowship at the University of Houston, and the Writers at Work Scholarship, Park City.

Liu is the author of the Norma Farber First Book Award–winning Vox Angelica (1992), as well as Burnt Offerings (1995), Say Goodnight (1998), and Hard Evidence (2001). He has also edited Word of Mouth: An Anthology of Gay American Poetry (2000). Except for Vox Angelica, all of his books have been finalists for Lambda Literary Awards. His poetry is widely anthologized and frequently appears in various journals such as Antioch Review, Chelsea, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Ploughshares, and Poetry. He lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Gay American Poets and Playwrights: An A-to-Z Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.