The Psychology of Terrorism: Programs and Practices in Response and Prevention - Vol. 4

By Chris E. Stout | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A project such as this one—with authors from all over the world covering a breadth and depth of examination of such a complex topic—can only happen as the result of a team effort. As such, I would like first of all to thank my family. Annika, Grayson, and I have sacrificed many a weekend of playing together; and I have also missed time with my very supportive partner and wife, Dr. Karen Beckstrand. Debora Carvalko, our editor at Greenwood, has been the crucial link in this project. She has worked with herculean effort to keep things organized and working. In fact, it is thanks to her that this project was even undertaken. The Editorial Advisory Board worked diligently, reading and commenting on many more manuscripts than those seen herein. The work of Terrence Koller, Malini Patel, Dana Royce Baerger, Steven P. Kouris, and Ronald F. Levant was impeccable and key to ensuring the quality of the chapters. I am also indebted to the council of Hedwin Naimark for invaluable help and thinking.

Professor Klaus Schwab has been a valued resource to me over the years and he was kind enough to provide the foreword. Harvey Langholtz has been an ongoing source of inspiration and mentorship to me. He is without a doubt the most diplomatic of all psychologists I know (it must have been all those years at the United Nations). And, this project would have been no more than an idea without the intellectual productivity of the contributing authors. We were fortunate to have more submissions than we could use in the end, but even those whose works were not used surely had an impact on my thinking and perspective, and I am very grateful. Finally, behind-the-scenes thanks to Ralph Musicant, Lawrence W. Osborn, Phillip Zimbardo, Patrick DeLeon, and Michael Horowitz.

I am markedly indebted to you all at a level that I shall never be able to repay. My sincere thanks to each of you.

-xiii-

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