Collingwood and the Metaphysics of Experience

By Giuseppina D’oro | Go to book overview

Notes

1Collingwood and the metaphysics of experience
1
R. G. Collingwood, An Essay on Philosophical Method, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1933.
2
R. G. Collingwood, The Principles of Art, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1938.
3
R. G. Collingwood, The Idea of Nature, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1945.
4
R. G. Collingwood, The Idea of History, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1946; revised edition, edited by Jan Van der Dussen, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
5
R. G. Collingwood, An Essay on Metaphysics, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1940; revised edition, edited by Rex Martin, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
6
For an account of the three senses of the term cause see W. H. Dray, ‘Historical Causation and Human Free Will’, University of Toronto Quarterly 29 (1960) and R. Martin, ‘Collingwood on Reasons, Causes and the Explanation of Action’, International Studies in Philosophy23 (1991).
7
H. J. Paton, Kant’s Metaphysic of Experience, London: Muirhead Library of Philosophy, 1936.
8
Strawson first introduced the term ‘descriptive’ metaphysics in Individuals, where he contrasts descriptive metaphysics, which is said to be ‘content to describe the actual structure of our thought about the world’, with revisionary metaphysics, which is described as being ‘concerned to produce a better structure’ (Individuals, London: Methuen, 1959, p. 9). Collingwood has no such distinction between revisionary and descriptive metaphysics. Collingwood’s conception of metaphysics as a science of absolute presuppositions or as a metaphysics without ontology is contrasted, rather, with metaphysics understood as the science of pure being or of things-in-themselves.
9
R. G. Collingwood, ‘Lectures on Moral Philosophy’, Introduction, 1929, Bodleian Library, Collingwood Dep. 10.

2The Kantian heritage of Collingwood’s descriptive metaphysics
1
Any comparative study of Kant and Collingwood is riddled with problems not least because of the lack of agreement, within Kantian scholarship, on the precise nature of Kant’s reform of metaphysics. As far as Kant’s theoretical philosophy is concerned, there appear to be two main lines of interpretation that divide on the issue of whether Kant’s transcendental idealism is a purely epistemological thesis or whether there still is an ontological commitment in Kant’s transcendental philosophy. Often this interpretative divide goes hand in hand with certain views concerning Kant’s attitude to scepticism.

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