Politics in An Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration

By Harvey L. Schantz | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Gerald M. Pomper, “The Presidential Election,” in The Election of 1996: Reports and Interpretations, ed. Pomper (Chatham, NJ: Chatham House, 1997), 173.
2.
All 1996 election returns are from Richard M. Scammon, Alice V. McGillivray, and Rhodes Cook, America Votes 22 (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc., 1998).
3.
Richard M. Scammon and Alice V. McGillivray, America Votes 20 (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc., 1993), 9; and Scammon, McGillivray, and Cook, America Votes 22, 1.
4.
The composition of the electorate is based on the Voter News Service exit poll available at www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/1996 polls. For a comparison to the electorate of 1992, see Milton C. Cummings Jr., “Political Change Since the New Deal: The l992 Presidential Election in Historical Perspective,” in American Presidential Elections: Process, Policy, and Political Change, ed. Harvey L. Schantz (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996), 51-53.
5.
This narrative account of Clinton’s first three years in office and the 1996 campaign and vote draws heavily on Milton C. Cummings Jr. and David Wise, Democracy Under Pressure: An Introduction to the American Political System, 8th ed. (Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1997), 405-420.
6.
Pomper, “The Presidential Election,” 173.
7.
George J. Church, “The Democrats: The Learning Curve,” Time, September 2, 1996, 33.
8.
Responses to the question: “Do you approve or disapprove of the way __________ is handling his job as President?” Gallup Opinion Index, Report No. 180, August 1980, 26; Gallup Report, December 1983, No. 219, 18; and data provided for 1992 by the Gallup Poll.
9.
Data supplied by the Gallup Poll.
10.
See John T. Tierney, “The Context: Policies and Politics, 1993-1996,” in America’s Choice: The Election of 1996, ed. William Crotty and Jerome M. Mileur, (Guilford, CT: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill, 1997), 24-25.
11.
Church, “The Democrats,” 32.
12.
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
13.
“A Closer Look at the Debate,” USA, October 7, 1996, A13.
14.
Susan Page, “Debaters Clash Over Vision, Rivals Cite Fundamental Differences,” USA, October 7, 1996, A1.
15.
www.allpolitics.com, October 9, 1996.
16.
Bill Nichols, “Dole on Offense in Debate,” USA, October 17, 1996, A1.
17.
This section is based on the Voter News Service Exit Poll available at www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/1996polls.
18.
The Midwest includes the five Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin, the Prairie states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota, along with Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri.

-83-

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Politics in An Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Series Editor Foreword xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Some Things Are Predictable 1
  • Chapter 2 - Congressional Nominations in 1996 41
  • Chapter 3 - The Presidential Campaign and Vote in 1996 63
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter 4 - Strategic Partisan Decisions and Blunted National Outcomes 85
  • Chapter 5 - Sideshows and Strategic Separations 105
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 6 - Clinton’s Second Transition 129
  • Notes 150
  • Chapter 7 - The Irony of the 105th Congress and Its Legacy 155
  • Notes 177
  • Epilogue 181
  • List of Contributors 183
  • Index 185
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