Politics in An Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration

By Harvey L. Schantz | Go to book overview
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NOTES
1.
James P. Pfiffner, The Strategic Presidency: Hitting the Ground Running, 2nd ed. (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996), 111; idem, “Presidential Transitions: Organization, People, and Policy,” paper delivered at the 1996 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, San Francisco, 18. Also see Paul Light, The President’s Agenda: Domestic Policy Choice from Kennedy to Carter (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982), 26.
2.
A. Lane Crothers, “Asserting Dominance: Presidential Transitions from Out-Party to In-Party, 1932-1992,” Polity 26 (Summer 1994): 811.
3.
NYT, November 11, 1996.
4.
Rhodes Cook, “Even With Higher Vote, Clinton Remains Minority President,” CQWR, January 18, 1997, 185-188.
5.
Voter News Service exit polls for 1996 in “Presidential Election Exit Poll Results,” CNN/Time All Politics, 1996, http://allpolitics.com/elections/natl/.exit.poll/index1 (November 8, 1996).
6.
Allan Freedman, “Lawyers Take a Back Seat in the 105th Congress,” CQWR, January 4, 1997, 27-30.
7.
NYT, January 20, 1997.
8.
Jackie Koszczuk, et al., “Committee Votes for Reprimand, $300,000 Fine for Gingrich,” CQWR, January 18, 1997, 160-161.
9.
Donna Cassata, “Freshmen Bring a Bit Less Fire, More Savvy to Capitol Hill,” CQWR, January 4, 1997, 25-26.
10.
Bob Gravely, “From Arms to Buddhists to Coffee: The ABCs of the Investigations,” CQWR, April 5, 1997, 797, 800-801.
11.
Jackie Koszczuk, “Republicans Set the Stage: Try 104th Agenda Again,” CQWR, March 8, 1997, 575.
12.
Peter Baker and John F. Harris, “Clinton to Pursue Agenda Through Executive Powers,” WP, April 11, 1997, A1, A20; and Peter Baker, “Clinton To Seek FEC Ban on ‘Soft Money,’” WP, June 4, 1997, A1, A9.
13.
Thomas J. Weko, The Politicizing Presidency: The White House Personnel Office, 1948-1994 (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995), 5, 46, 109-121.
14.
Pfiffner, The Strategic Presidency, 171-172.
15.
On the early stages of the second Clinton transition, see Pfiffner, “Presidential Transitions: Organization, People, and Policy.”
16.
Al Kamen and Stephen Barr, “Presidential Personnel Chief Promises Kinder, Smoother Transition,” WP, November 21, 1996, A23.
17.
As quoted in the WP, December 21, 1996, A16.
18.
John F. Harris, “Second Transition to Show if Clinton Learned Lessons,” WP, November 10, 1996, A1, A20.
19.
Peter Baker, “President Taps Bowles, Trouble-shooter and Friend, to Lead Staff,” WP, November 9, 1996, A1, 14.
20.
For more details, see John F. Harris, “Clinton Fills Out Roster for White House Team,” WP, December 19, 1996, 25. Quotation from Todd S. Purdum,

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