Politics in An Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration

By Harvey L. Schantz | Go to book overview

Epilogue

HARVEY L. SCHANTZ

The most notable political development during the second Clinton administration was the House impeachment of the president. On December 19, 1998, the 105th U.S. House voted two articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton for grand jury perjury in testimony concerning his relations with Monica Lewinsky and Paula Jones, and for obstruction of justice in the Jones sexual harassment lawsuit. The 106th U.S. Senate, however, on February 12, 1999, acquitted Clinton on both articles.

In both chambers of Congress, the pattern of the vote demonstrated the importance of congressional political parties and the hazards of divided government for presidents. In the House, the grand jury perjury and obstruction of justice articles of impeachment drew only five Democratic supporters, but was voted for by 223 and 216 Republicans, respectively. In the Senate, neither article of impeachment attracted a single Democratic vote, but they drew 45 and 50 Republicans, respectively. Clearly a Democratic Congress would not have brought Clinton to the brink of removal from office.

A second significant political development was the loss of seats by House Republicans in the 1998 midterm election. In November 1998, the Republicans retained control of the U.S. House, but the five-seat Democratic gain was the first pickup of seats for the president’s party at midterm since 1934, and only the second such gain since 1862. Many congressional Republicans blamed Speaker Newt Gingrich for the loss of seats, and three days after election day, Gingrich declined to run for the Speakership in the newly elected Congress. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) became the new Speaker on January 6, 1999, at the outset of the 106th Congress.

A number of politicians emerged from the 1998 election with heightened prospects for election 2000. In New York State, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton effectively campaigned for successful Democratic senate candidate Charles Schumer, and thus positioned herself for a senate candidacy of her own. Meanwhile, Texas Governor George W. Bush Jr., was reelected by a large margin and quickly became the front-runner for the Republican presidential

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics in An Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Series Editor Foreword xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Some Things Are Predictable 1
  • Chapter 2 - Congressional Nominations in 1996 41
  • Chapter 3 - The Presidential Campaign and Vote in 1996 63
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter 4 - Strategic Partisan Decisions and Blunted National Outcomes 85
  • Chapter 5 - Sideshows and Strategic Separations 105
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 6 - Clinton’s Second Transition 129
  • Notes 150
  • Chapter 7 - The Irony of the 105th Congress and Its Legacy 155
  • Notes 177
  • Epilogue 181
  • List of Contributors 183
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.