Stories Matter: The Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics

By Rita Charon; Martha Montello | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13

NARRATIVE UNDERSTANDING AND METHODS IN PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

RICHARD MARTINEZ

INTRODUCTION

In recent years, narrative approaches in clinical and ethical decision-making in psychiatry, psychotherapy, and behavioral health have increased in importance. While the waning of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic teaching in residency programs and the increased effectiveness of psychopharmacologic interventions in clinical practice have decreased the profession’s reliance on interpretive or “talking” psychotherapy, the influence of the medical humanities has increased interest and curiosity about narrative theory and application in the behavioral health fields. Managed care has had a negative impact on health care education and health care practice, and yet it has had a positive impact by fueling new discussion and reflection upon the fundamental ethical aspects that define the patient-professional relationship in health care.

In this chapter, I present the case of J.S., a former patient who was in treatment with me for more than ten years and helped me to explore ways in which narrative can improve clinical and ethical decision-making in psychiatry and psychotherapy. 1 A narrative therapeutic approach evolved in our work together over the last ten years. J.S. has reviewed this manuscript and has given permission for its publication. I have changed several elements to protect her privacy.


THE CASE OF J.S.

J.S. is a forty-five-year-old divorced woman. Her first appointment with me was ten years ago. In those first sessions, she told me that she had seen another psychiatrist, Dr. A., who had diagnosed her with major depression, anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a mild borderline personality disorder. She was treated with several medications, including an antidepressant, an antianxiety medication, and a medication for occasional sleep disturbance. Over the years, she had tried numerous antidepressants, antianxiety agents, and mood-stabilizing medications. At the time of her first visit with me, she believed that she was on an optimal combination of medications.

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stories Matter: The Role of Narrative in Medical Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.