Restructuring the New York City Government: The Reemergence of Municipal Reform

By Frank J. Mauro; Gerald Benjamin | Go to book overview

Toward Fairness and Openness
in City Administrative Procedures

RICHARD A. GIVENS

On 8 November 1988, the voters of New York City enacted a new Chapter 45 of the New York City charter, creating an innovative City Adminstrative Procedure Act (CAPA). The question had been submitted by the Charter Revision Commission. By placing this initiative before the voters, who approved it by an almost four-to-one margin, New York City gave the CAPA a magisterial dignity that is difficult for city agencies to ignore; its electoral success could gain nationwide attention.

The CAPA makes several landmark changes that should improve the city's administrative operations in ways that may be relevant in other metropolitan areas. One impetus for its development was a pattern of city agencies' adopting what amounted to binding rules without public notice. Another was the existence in many agencies of unfair combinations of prosecutorial and judicial functions. At the same time, the Charter Revision Commission was interested in establishing standards of fairness and effectiveness in city administration appropriate for the twenty-first century. A third source of some of the innovations was a series of recommendations by the New York State Bar Association's Task Force on Simplification of the Law, which included suggestions for simplification at the municipal level.


The Right to Know What Regulations Must Be Obeyed

The single most salient change adopted by CAPA may be its recommendation (also made by the task force) that city regulations purporting to be binding on outside parties must be published in a single place, indexed by subject, and kept up to date. Otherwise, such laws would be unenforceable. The objective is to create a compilation comparable to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at the city level. A former provision of the charter already required publication of such a compilation, but it had never been consistently carried out.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Restructuring the New York City Government: The Reemergence of Municipal Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.