Contraception across Cultures: Technologies, Choices, Constraints

By Andrew Russell; Elisa J. Sobo et al. | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Jennifer Phillips Davids has a Ph.D. in anthropology and an MPH in international health from Emory University. Since 1993, she has conducted research among the Ethiopian immigrant community in Israel on reproductive decisions, fertility transition, and life course change. In addition, she has conducted research on teen pregnancy and perinatal outcome among African Americans in Atlanta, piloted methods for the field determination of reproductive status (among the Hadza in Tanzania), and examined the social context of interpersonal relationships among patients with Alzheimer's disease. She is currently a visiting lecturer at Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

Katarina Greifeld has a Ph.D. in social anthropology (1984) and is an international health consultant and a medical social anthropologist. She works for different cooperation agencies all over the world, mainly in relation to target group issues in health and environment. She lectures at the University of Heidelberg and was recently assigned by the European Commission to expert panels in health, ethics and environment.

Amy Kaler has a Ph.D. in sociology and a minor in Feminist Studies from the University of Minnesota, awarded in 1998. She is presently a postdoctoral fellow at the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania, where she is working on several research projects concerning culture, gender and reproductive technologies in southern and eastern Africa.

Rhoda Kanaaneh received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University in 1998. She is Assistant Prof. of Women's Studies at New York University. Her forthcoming book on nationalism, globalization, medicalization, gender and reproduction among Palestinians is entitled The Reproductive Measure: Negotiating Babies and Boundaries in the Galilee, to be published by University of California Press.

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