Contraception across Cultures: Technologies, Choices, Constraints

By Andrew Russell; Elisa J. Sobo et al. | Go to book overview

1
Introdiction: Contraception Across
Andrew Russell and Mary S. Thompson

Conceptions and Contraceptions

The development of new contraceptive technologies over the last fifty years has profound implications for social relationships between men and women. Conversely, gender and other power relationships at local and global levels have implications for the way the new contraceptive technologies are developed, disseminated and used. The aim of this volume is to investigate the impact of contraception on society, and of society on contraception, from a cross-cultural, anthropological perspective using case studies and overviews from around the world (see Figure 1.1).

Compared to recent interest in the new reproductive technologies within anthropology (e.g. Strathern 1992; Edwards et al. 1993), attention paid to contraception has been relatively scant. 1 While no-one can deny the awesome social and cultural implications of many of the reproductive technologies that anthropologists have addressed, such as in vitro fertilization, the fact remains that few people worldwide are ever likely to have the chance to use these innovations. Contraception, on the other hand, impinges on the lives of the majority of heterosexual couples in their childbearing years, irrespective of income or social status.

In light of this, Andrew Russell and Elisa Sobo convened an international conference, ‘Changing Contraceptives: Choices, Technologies and Constraints’, in September 1996. 2 The conference examined contraception cross-culturally, and the methodological approaches anthropologists and others use to shed light on contraception-related patterns of thought and action. The majority of chapters in this volume were first presented as papers at the conference.

This chapter outlines the themes and theories that underlie the study of, drawing together the work of the other

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contraception across Cultures: Technologies, Choices, Constraints
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.