CHAPTER IX
A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE FUTURE

No sooner had the nots of December 14 and 15, 1925, cemented the agreement between Sir Austen Chamberlain and Mussolini, than Mussolini began to rend the air with shouts about the world's duty to give Italy the room she wanted for colonial expansion.

In an interview with the United Press on December 21, 1925, he announced:

"History is not lacking in examples of methods for attaining peaceful divisions of territory, which permitted the Powers to safeguard the peace and prosperity of their peoples. I have confidence that, when the occasion presents itself, Italy will not lack the means to obtain pacifically what belongs to her. The other nations would be taking upon themselves a great responsibility if they opposed an obstinate resistance to the moderate aspirations of Italy, who wishes to assure her own future as a great power."

In an article published in the review Gerarchia in January 1926, Mussolini announced that 1926 would mark "the Fascist revolution's Napoleonic year".

"It is permissible to assume from what is happening in this old Europe, more especially in those countries still ruled by the immortal principles of 1789, that the spirit of Locarno is evaporating with startling rapidity. Before long, nothing will remain but a faded label of what appeared to be at one moment a marvellous elixir for prolonged peace."

On March 28, he gave an address to the Fascists in Rome which awakened the most fervid expectations:

"Comrades, I seem to see in your eyes, I seem to read in your hearts, the restlessness that comes of delay. You are waiting for something. ('Yes! yes!') If I say that the impatience that leaps in your hearts will one day be satisfied, will you believe me? (Renewed cries of 'Yes!') The great hour does not strike at all times or in all places. The wheel of fortune passes. He is a wise man who watches and seizes it as it speeds by him. When the wheel of destiny passes within reach of our hand, we shall stand ready to seize it and bend it to our will. Comrades, it is fine to live in the shadow of our flag, but if need arises, it will be finer still to die for it."

The Secrctary-General of the Fascist Party( GI. 1.iv.26) announced that "Italy felt that her hour was about to strike". The

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prelude to World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 519

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.