CHAPTER XLVI
THE TEMPEST

The Hoare-Laval Plan was a great triumph for Mussolini. First of all it upset the time-table of sanctions.1 Moreover, he was given the right to annex half of Ethiopia. As the Italian Fascist organ in France, La Nuova Italia, wrote ( 12. xii), the offer proved that "the two great Powers knew that Italy was not the aggressor". "We have never heard that conciliatory proposals are made to aggressor nations". If Mussolini had accepted the plan, the English electorate and the House of Commons would have been confronted with a fait accompli. Peace would have ensued, and peace—even if it is a bad peace-is always preferable to war, especially if others pay the price.

Feiling states that Baldwin and his colleagues agreed to the Hoare- Laval terms "with much dissatisfaction". And from Neville Chamberlain's diary one gathers that he had no idea that Hoare would consider "detailed peace proposals":

"I believed, and as far as I know, my colleagues believed also, that in Paris only some plan would be worked out, which could prevent the League from prejudicing the chances of a favourable issue by thrusting in a particularly provocative extra sanction at that moment."2

Neville Chamberlain, engrossed as he was in the business of his department, was, most likely, not kept informed on all the details of the Paris-London negotiations. But the Hoare-Laval plan did not spring up like a mushroom overnight. Feiling himself states (p. 273) that since October, British officials had been in Paris working out a peace plan. Sir Samuel's course of action in Paris was the outcome of everything that had been done with Baldwin's full consent during the whole of the preceding year. As the Manchester Guardian ( 12. xii) explained, the problem Baldwin had to solve was whether "the League should become a society for the compensation of unsuccessful aggressors or collective security should be made the principle for collective robbery". Baldwin had solved this problem long before he sat down to breakfast on the morning of December 9 and read Peterson's report.

During the night of December 8-9, Augur cabled from London to the New York Times an exact summary of the plan; the Paris correspondent did the same; and on the morning of the 9th, the Petit Parisien, Echo de Parish, and L'Œuvre gave the same digest in Paris. According to Feis, "the current and probably correct surmise is that

____________________
1
Feis, op. cit., p. 263.
2
Feiling, Life of Neville Chamberlain, p. 274.

-395-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prelude to World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 519

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.