Families and Social Workers: The Work of Family Service Units, 1940-1985

By Pat Starkey | Go to book overview

Introduction

It has never been one of the giants of voluntary social work. Management consultants called in to comment on its structure in 1988 noted its relatively small size and ‘hand to mouth’ financial existence. 1 What was true at the end of the 1980s was equally true 40 years earlier, but in spite of its small size and its recent arrival in the social work field, Family Service Units (FSU) had been more confident of its role in the immediate post-war period than in 1988. In the intervening years it had exercised an influence on the development of social work practice and training which was out of all proportion to its size and financial resources.

Its important place in the history of a developing profession could not easily have been predicted. Originating in the activities of a small group of conscientious objectors who attempted to respond to the demands of wartime suffering by involving themselves in relief work, it came to the attention of politicians and the public alike with the publication of an account of the activities of the Liverpool, Manchester and Stepney Pacifist Service Units (PSU) during the war. 2 The book attracted both national and international publicity. The active interest of Lord Balfour of Burleigh led the PSUs in Liverpool and Manchester to abandon the creed which had motivated their wartime work and to set up a more conventional voluntary social work agency, renamed Family Service Units, in 1948. The agency consisted of no more than a handful of young, untrained workers. Although confident of the value of their work, and convinced of the existence of the social phenomenon of the problem family, they were surprised to find themselves in receipt of invitations to establish units in towns and cities throughout Britain. They rose to the challenge, however, and throughout the next decade, units were set up and workers trained. FSU slowly and steadily positioned itself within post-war welfare arrangements.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Families and Social Workers: The Work of Family Service Units, 1940-1985
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations vi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • 1 - Pacifist Service 8
  • Notes 38
  • 2 - Problem Families, Eugenics and FSU 45
  • Notes *
  • 3 - The Growth of a Social Work Agency 77
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Changes and Adjustments 98
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Training and Professional Development 141
  • Notes 168
  • 6 - Changing Relationships with the State 174
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Almost Not an Organisation 212
  • Notes *
  • Conclusion 247
  • Bibliography 251
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 279

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.