Compromise Formations: Current Directions in Psychoanalytic Criticism

By Vera J. Camden | Go to book overview

The Uses of Literature in the
Psychoanalytic Process

Frederick Wyatt

Today when we address the subject of literature in psychoanalysis, we are reconsidering a relationship which, in fact, reaches back to the beginnings of psychoanalysis. 1 One could well date its origin with Freud's letter to Fliess of 15 October 1897 (Freud, Letters) and arrive at results which may still strike us as surprising. I shall give a summary of this letter, then cite several passages from it. Initially, Freud reports upon the continuation of his self-analysis and in the process begins to talk about his old nursemaid, who was discovered to be a thief and was therefore discharged. He then reflects upon a dream of his own which concerns taking money from the mother of a doctor. He conjectures that, as a small child, he must have heard that the nursemaid was a thief but then forgot this information. Her disappearance must have had some effect on him. What happened to the memory of her disappearance, he asks himself in that letter to Fliess. At this point he recalls a thought which from time to time takes possession of him: "I can't find my mother. I cry in despair.... Brother Philipp, twenty years my senior, who was evidently supposed to take care of me, opens (probably to satisfy my demands) a locked wardrobe, Kasten in Austrian parlance, and not finding mother here either, I cry even harder until she comes through the door, slim and beautiful."

Subsequently, Freud explains this sequence of memories as follows: "I must have been afraid that mother had disappeared just like the old nurse-maid. I must have also heard something to the effect that the latter was locked up because of her stealing—'eingekastett' [Austrian dialect,

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Compromise Formations: Current Directions in Psychoanalytic Criticism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.