Aboriginal Australians: Black Responses to White Dominance, 1788-2001

By Richard Broome | Go to book overview

5
Stifling Aboriginal
Initiative

The ability of the Aborigines to adapt their traditional skills to European ways was symbolised in the 1860s by the cricketing prowess of some Aboriginal men from the Madimadi and Wutjubaluk people of the Wimmera and Mallee areas. After several Aboriginal stockmen played successfully for the Edenhope cricket team, an Aboriginal team was formed which played both in the district and in Melbourne. Two of its members, Cuzens and Bullocky, were subsequently selected to represent Victoria in inter-colonial competition. The Aboriginal team attracted sufficient attention for promoters to organise several tours within Australia and finally one to England in 1868.

Although 10 matches were scheduled in England, the team proved sufficiently popular for the tour to be extended to 47 matches. It was far more strenuous than modern cricket tours as the team had fewer reserve players; played for longer hours on rougher pitches with fewer breaks; and spent more hours travelling in bone-shattering coaches over poorer roads. English observers held mixed views of their abilities. However, their cricketing inexperience was balanced by the skills and agility possessed by the hunter-gatherer, which enabled them to win 14 matches, lose 14 and draw 19 against experienced district teams throughout England—a creditable record. The doyen of English cricket, W.G. Grace, commented that they ‘acquitted themselves very well’ and that some had shown ‘conspicuous skill at the game’. No doubt his last remarks were directed to Mullagh, Lawrence and Cuzens, who took 609 of the team's 714 wickets and made 4212 of the team's 7555 runs.

Each match was followed by a sports carnival at which Dick-a-Dick always won the backwards sprint; Mullagh usually won the high jump reaching 1.70 metres on his best jump; and the Aboriginal cricketers invariably won the cricket ball throwing competition. These events were followed by a boomerang throwing exhibition by Charley Dumas and a mock battle of spear throwing in traditional dress. Most spectacular of all was Dick-a-Dick's prowess at dodging the cricket ball. Using his shield, wooden club and his traditional skills of spear dodging, he

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aboriginal Australians: Black Responses to White Dominance, 1788-2001
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface to the Third Edition 8
  • 1 - Traditional Life 13
  • 2 - The Gamaraigal Confront the British 26
  • 3 - Resisting the Invaders 40
  • 4 - Cultural Resistance Amidst Destruction 56
  • 5 - Stifling Aboriginal Initiative 73
  • 6 - Racism Enshrined 91
  • 7 - Mixed Missionary Blessings 105
  • 8 - Aborigines in the Cattle Industry 124
  • 9 - Aborigines and the Caste Barrier 147
  • 10 - Breaking Down the Barriers 164
  • 11 - Towards Self-Determination 188
  • 12 - Ambivalent Times 206
  • 13 - Aborigines under Siege 244
  • Appendix 1 288
  • Appendix 2 290
  • Appendix 3 292
  • Notes 293
  • Select Bibliography 315
  • Index 322
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.