Design Culture in Liverpool, 1880-1914: The Origins of the Liverpool School of Architecture

By Christopher Crouch | Go to book overview

Index
Abercrombie, Patrick 165, 166, 170, 172
Adams, Maurice 29, 32, 33, 34, 146
Adshead, Stanley 158, 165, 167–70, 173, 174, 179, 185
Allen, Charles 107, 111, 112
America
Beaux Arts practice 44
modernity xi
Liverpool links xiii, 2, 9, 13
Anning Bell, Richard 106, 107, 109, 111, 112, 115
Architectural Alliance 76, 77, 78
Architectural Association 51, 63, 76, 77
Art Workers' Guild 40, 62, 72, 79, 80, 87, 94, 95, 103, 107
Arts and Crafts
Adshead, Stanley 166, 168, 170
anonymity 103
Beaux Arts practice xi, 41, 152, 186
City Beautiful movement 154
Conway, W. M. 55, 56
Department of Civic Design, Liverpool University 166
design ideology 10, 70
egalitarianism and labour 35
exhibiting societies 107
Garden City movement 158
Gothic styling 23
handicrafts 30, 100
Jackson, Thomas 96, 97
Liverpool 11
Liverpool Cathedral Competition 17
Liverpool School of Architecture and Applied Art 12, 15, 50, 96, 102, 170, 184
Port Sunlight 11, 18, 152
Reilly, Charles 148, 151, 170
Simpson, Frederick 102
Utopian socialism 26, 153
Ashbee, Charles 18, 19, 75, 158, 171
Bartlett School of Architecture 145
Beaux Arts
Adshead, Stanley 166, 168
American architecture 44, 107, 128, 133, 137, 139
Arts and Crafts xi
atelier system 97
baroque 41
Chicago World's Fair 138
City Beautiful movement 13, 158
Department of Civic Design, Liverpool University 166
Gothic styling 73
Ideal City 186
ideology 10
Liverpool School of Architecture and Applied Art 15, 102, 107, 116, 137, 138, 184
metropolitan values 13
Modern Movement xiii
modern technology 136
Port Sunlight 184
Reilly, Charles 144, 148, 150, 151, 156, 169
Simpson, Frederick 103, 150
union of artistic practices 149
Ware, William 105
Blomfield, Reginald 39, 40, 43, 62, 145
Bloomfield Bare, Herbert xii, 73, 74, 111–14
Bodley, G. F. 44, 61, 96
Bradbury, George 110
Bradshaw, Henry 54
Breuer, Marcel 186

-197-

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