Gothic Modernisms

By Andrew Smith; Jeff Wallace | Go to book overview

10
Arctic Masks in a Castle of Ice:
Gothic Vorticism and Wyndham
Lewis's Self Condemned
Francesca Orestano

‘1. Savageness. 2. Changefulness. 3. Naturalism. 4. Grotesqueness. 5. Rigidity. 6. Redundance…’ 1: the attention bestowed by John Ruskin on the moral elements of Gothic architecture provides a lineage of ideas which not only point backwards, to the so-called Dark Ages, but also anticipates the early twentieth-century art projects globally known as Modernisms. The aesthetic relevance of Gothic art within the social issues tackled by Ruskin's oeuvre, and its reception within the artistic programme of the early modernist avant-garde in England, have already been critically mapped. 2 Aware of the necessity of a moral action, in order to dispel the superficial effusions of Victorian humanitarianism, Ruskin saw in the nature of Gothic a way out of a tradition of sterile repetition, which enforced collective social slavery. While his personal utopia demanded that art should reflect and provide moral values to its age, Ruskin's perception of a decadent fin de siècle, rescued by a savage, rigid, grotesquely redundant art, juxtaposing past and present, history and miracle, image and logos, and fantastic combinations of human, animal, plant, would consequently lead towards the modernist appraisal of significant form per se– as Clive Bell maintained in Art (1913), and Roger Fry actively promoted. Both the Post-Impressionists’ exhibitions organised by Fry in 1910 and 1912 3 and the new periodisation of art history he proposed in Vision and Design (1920) in order to rescue from the shadow of pre-Renaissance neglect Giotto and the art of the so-called ‘primitives’, tend to assert visual values whose formal quality, savagely unstable, is charged with a violent anti-naturalist streak. Wyndham Lewis (1884–1957), the Canadian-born painter, novelist, critic, leader of the English avant-garde, would later observe:

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gothic Modernisms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.