Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

5-7 fr.), founded by Prince Odescalchi (fine beach; special trains from Rome on Sun. and Thurs. in summer). 181½. M. Palidóro.

The line now turns to the right, towards the groves of (185½ M.) Maccarese, the ancient Fregenae, on the Arrone (p. 117), the Aro of the ancients. We then skirt the former Stagno di Maccarese, which is now being reclaimed ( Bonífica di Maccarese, comp. p. 493). This tract, which is still the home of about 1000 buffaloes, belongs to Prince Giuseppe Rospigliosi of Rome.

193 M. Ponte Galéra, whence a branch-line diverges to Fiumicino (p. 490).

Near (197½ M.) Magliana (p. 489) the Tiber becomes visible, and the line follows its course (comp. Map, p. 426). A freer view is now obtained of the extensive Campagna; to the right, in the background, the Alban Mts., and to the left the Sabine Mts.; in the foreground is San Paolo fuori le Mura.

201 M. Roma San Paolo, outside the Porta Portese (change carriages for Trastevere, comp. p. 149). The train crosses the Tiber and skirts the S. E. walls of Rome. To the left are seen the Monto Testaccio, the Pyramid of Cestius, the Aventine, the Lateran with the statues crowning its façade, and finally, just before the station is entered, the so-called Temple of Minerva Medica. 204½ M. Roma Tuscolana.

207 M. Rome, see p. 149.


2. From Pisa to Volterra.

Railway viâ Cecina to Volterra station, 50½ M., in 2½-3 hrs. Express to Cecina (no through-connection) 6 fr. 55, 4 fr. 60 c.; ordinary trains 5 fr. 95, 4 fr. 15, 2 fr. 70 c.; from Cecina to Volterra 3 fr. 50, 2 fr. 45, 1 fr. 60 c. Diligence from the station to Volterra (7 M.) in hr. (fare fr.; one-horse carr. 4, two-horse 6 fr.). Luggage may be left at the station at Cecina.

Volterra may be reached also from Pontedéra, a station on the Florence and Pisa line (see Baedeker's Northern Italy), by driving up the valley of the Era (5-6 hrs.). A private diligence (fare 3 fr.) performs the journey thrice weekly.

Pisa, see Baedeker's Northern Italy. To (31½ M.) Cecina, see p. 3. The branch-line ascends hence on the right bank of the Cecina, traversing a district of great mineral wealth (copper, alabaster, and serpentine). M. Riparbella; the village lies M. to the N. 10½ M. Casino di Terra; 14½ M. Ponte Ginori.

18½ M. Volterra. The station is situated at the foot of the lofty hill on which the town lies. The extensive salt-works (Saline) in the vicinity supply the whole of Tuscany. The rock-salt, resembling that of the Wieliczka mines in Galicia, is found in lenticular form, embedded in a tertiary deposit of marl.

-10-

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