Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview
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7. From Florence to Perugia viâ Arezzo,
Cortona, and Terontola (Chiusi-Rome).

102½ M. Railway. Fast express on Mon., Wed., & Frid. in summer in 3 hrs. 21 min. (fares 20 fr. 65, 14 fr. 45 c.); ordinary express (slow beyond Terontola) in 3½-hrs. (fares 20 fr. 60, 14 fr. 40, 9 fr. 35 c.); ordinary trains in 6¼-7 hrs. (fares 19 fr. 15, 13 fr. 46, 8 fr. 65 c.). To Arezzo, 54¼ M., in 1½-4 hrs. (fares 11 fr. 25, 7 fr. 90, 5 fr. 15 c., or 10 fr. 25, 7 fr. 15, 4 fr. 60 c.); thence to Cortona, 17½ M., in ½-1 hr. (fares 3 fr. 25, 2 fr. 30, 1 fr. 50 c.). Those who wish to see Arezzo and Cortona and arrive at Perugia in one day, had better leave Florence in the afternoon or evening and sleep at Arezzo.

The Express to Rome quits the Perugia line at Terontola (see R. 11), where passengers for Perugia generally change carriages. The fast express, mentioned above, runs viâ Perugia and Foligno and on to Rome ( Florence to Rome in hrs.; fares 35 fr. 30, 24 fr. 50 c.). Best views to the left.

Florence, see Baedeker's Northern Italy. The train describes a curve round the town. 3 M. Campo di Marte, a subsidiary station. It then runs along the N. bank of the Arno. Fiesole is seen on the height to the left. The valley contracts before reaching (8 M.) Compiobbi.13 M. Pontassieve (328 ft.), at the influx of the Sieve into the Arno.

From Pontassieve to ForlÌ, ca. 57 M., diligence daily in 12½ hrs. (fare fr.) by a good road through the Apennines. At (11 M.) Dicomano (519 ft.; Alb. Fratelli Falugiani, R. 1 fr.) we diverge to the E., quitting the valley of the Sieve, and, at the foot of the main rampart of the Apennines, reach (18 M.; hrs.) San Godenzo (1319 ft.; Alb. Agnoletti, R. fr.; Pens. Alpina, R. 1 fr.), with 2600 inhabitants. In the 11th cent. church here Dante and other exiles from Florence agreed in 1302 to make war against the Guelphic Signoria. The road continues to ascend in windings to (22½ M.) the top of the pass (2979 ft.), where there is a long wall (Muraglione) on one side or other of which we drive, according to the direction of the wind (extensive view). We descend through the Montone Valley viâ (27½ M.; 7 hrs.) San Benedetto in Alpe (1650 ft.), (33½ M.; 8 hrs.) Portico San Benedetto, (39 M.; hrs.) Rocca San Casciano (745 ft.; Alb. Al Ponte), and (51 M.; 11½ hrs.) Castrocaro, to (57 M.) Forlì (p. 121).

16 M. Sant' Ellěro (hence to Vallombrosa by the rack-and- pinion railway, see Baedeker's Northern Italy). We obtain a fine view to the left. The line curves to the S. and enters the valley of the middle Arno, passing through a short tunnel and then crossing to the left bank. From (18 31.) Rignano a pleasant excursion (a drive of ¾ hr.) may be made to the fine Villa Sanmezzano, belonging to Marchese Panciatichi of Florence. The train passes through another tunnel and reaches (22½ M.) Incisa in Valdarno, with a conspicuous castle on the other side of the river, which here forces its way through the limestone rock, whence the name of the village. 25½ M. Figline Valdarno. The valley of the Arno near Figline, Montevarchi, and Arezzo, is very interesting to palæontologists owing to the numerous fossil bones of the deer, elephant,

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