Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

zolo; to the right, San Pellegrino; farther on, to the left, Palazzo and San Facondino.

58 M. Gualdo Tadino (1510 ft.), a small town (Alb. Ancona) with 4440 inhab., lies about 1 M. to the E. of the railway-station (1755 ft.; cab 40 c.), near the insignificant ruins of the ancient Tadinae. In 552 Narses defeated and slew the Ostrogothic king Totila here. In the Palazzo Comunale are pictures by native artists, with a Pietà by Niccolò da Foligno ( 1471). The Cathedral has a fine rose-window.

We gradually descend to (68 M.) Nocera Umbra (1300 ft.), an episcopal town (5685 inhab.), on the site of the ancient Nuceria, a city of the Umbri (2 1/2 M. from the station; omn.). The Cathedral and the church of the Madernina contain a few fair paintings. Some excellent frescoes of 1434 may be seen on the organ-screen of San Francesco.The Orfanotrófio (Vescovado Antico) contains portraits of the bishops of Nocera from the 1st cent. of our era (!), painted in 1659.

On the W. slope of the Monte Pennino (5150 ft.), 2 1/2 M. to the S.E. of the town, is a prettily situated and much frequented Bath Hotel (1900 ft.; pens. 6 1/2-9 fr.; omn. at the station; open June-Sept.) , beside two thermal mineral springs known since 1510.

The train enters the narrow Val Topina, crosses the river several times, traverses a tunnel, and descends by Ponte Centesimo to —

80 M. Foligno. Thence to Rome, see pp. 85-96 and 106-9.


16. From Fabriano to Urbino.

50 M. Railway in 3 1/2 hrs. (fares 9 fr. 30, 6 fr. 50, 4 fr. 20 c.; two trains daily; no express).

Fabriano, see p. 141. — 2 1/2 M. Melano-Marischio (1150 ft.); 8 M. San Donato Marche (1100 ft.). — 10 1/2 M. Sassoferrato- Arcevia (1020 ft.). Sassoferrato (1266 ft.; Albergo Gius. Fata, R. 1 fr.), situated on the Scatino, with 3142 inhab., possesses interesting churches and pictures. Giambattista Salvi, surnamed Sassoferrato, was born here in 1605, and died at Rome in 1685. San Pietro, in the upper town, contains a Madonna by him.

In the vicinity are the ruins of the ancient Sentinum, wherse, in 295 B.C., the great decisive battle took place between the Romano and the allied Samnites, Gauls, Umbrians, and Etruscans, in which the crnsul Decius heroically sacrificed himself. The Roman supremacy over the whole of Italy was thus established. — About 8 M. to the N.E. of Sassoferrato (diligence in 2 hrs., back 1 1/2 hr.), on the road to Senigallia (p. 132), lies the little town of Arcevia (1755 ft.), with 2150 inhabitants. The church of San Medardo contains a large altar-piece by Luca Signorelli ( 1507; restored in 1890), a fine Baptism of Christ and a Madonna with saints ( 1520), by the same master, and a terracotta altar by Giovanni della Robbia ( 1513).

13 M. Monterosso Marche (1263 ft.); 17 1/2 M. Bellisio Solfare, with sulphur-mines; 20 M. Pergola (955 ft.); 23 M. Canneto Marche (1102 ft.). — 26 M. Frontone ( 1345 ft.), on a hill to the right.

-142-

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