Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher

By Esther Burnett Horne; Sally McBeth | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE

Life in Wyoming and at the
Haskell Indian Institute, 1923-1929

After the death of her father, Essie's family moved to Wyoming to be with relatives. Her account of growing up with a single parent echoes the plight of many families who were left in the same situation due to a parent's death in World War I. Although this move brought Essie into greater contact with her extended family, she and her siblings experienced what she deems "poverty and neglect."

The deterioration of the family situation triggered the enrollment of three of the Burnett children (Essie, Bernice, and Gordon) in Haskell Institute, an Indian boarding school in Lawrence, Kansas. Essie's recounting of this schooling reinforces the positive experience many Native Americans had at these educational institutions. The role the boarding school played in the (accidental) development of pan-Indianism is also illuminated through a glimpse of Essie's experience.

The picture is painted, from a personal and individual perspective, of the growth of self-assurance and independence of "Indian School" students. Ironically, this is coupled with the school's attempt at military-type discipline as part of its assimilationist mission.

Again, there is a personal picture of growing up, immersed in the very different values of two cultures, neither one excluding the other. Essie recalls exceptional teachers who influenced her, and mundane as well as exceptional events in this facet of the life history. The "jewel" here is a young life filled with the normal pains and joys of growing up. The "setting" is a (by today's standards) highly unusual multinational, multicultural boarding school which brought together peoples of many Indian nations and cultures.


WYOMING AND THE RESERVATION:
A FRAGILE SINGLE-PARENT FAMILY

After my father's death, my father's brother, Uncle Bill Burnett—an op

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.