Supremely Political: The Role of Ideology and Presidential Management in Unsuccessful Supreme Court Nominations

By John Massaro | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE DELICIOUS PLEASURE in completing this book is enhanced by the opportunity to acknowledge those who provided kindness and assistance over the long course of its preparation. The staffs at the following institutions were most considerate and efficient in providing support for my research and writing: National Endowment for the Humanities, Lyndon Baines Johnson Library, Nixon Presidential Materials Project, Margaret Chase Smith Library Center, Richard B. Russell Memorial Library, Gerald R. Ford Foundation, the NYS/UUP Professional Development and Quality of Working Life Committee, and the Clerical Center of Potsdam College of the State University of New York. I would also like to acknowledge the efficient work of those at the State University of New York Press, especially the efforts of Production Editor Elizabeth Moore.

Members of the academic communities at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Nasson College, University of Southern Maine, and Potsdam College of the State University of New York have consistently expressed genuine interest in my study of unsuccessful Supreme Court nominations and for that I am most appreciative. In particular, I would like to thank Randall Nelson for always being an excellent model of a demanding and caring teacher; Stephen L. Wasby not only for editing portions of the manuscript but for always insisting on my best effort; John White for believing in the worth of this project; and Sandy Schram for his friendship and gentle persistence in encouraging my return to the academic world. I would also like to acknowledge the many friends who helped in completing the project by directly assessing my research efforts, offering a kind word of encouragement, or simply providing a warm and inviting distraction. Included among this group are Calvin Senning, Peter Poor, Richard Del Guidice, Joan Schram, Judy Durham, Richard D'Abate, Fred and Barbara Aiello, Madelaine and Larry Ries,

-vii-

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