Magazines for the Millions: Gender and Commerce in the Ladies' Home Journal and the Saturday Evening Post, 1880-1910

By Helen Damon-Moore | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1.
LaRue Brown to Dorothy Kirchway, n.d. [Spring 1915] [38], quoted in Ellen K. Rothman, Hands and Hearts: A History of Courtship in America ( New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1984), p. 202.
2.
See, for example, Michele Barrett, "Ideology and the Cultural Production of Gender," in Judith Newton and Deborah Rosenfelt, eds., Feminist Criticism and Social Change ( New York: Methuen, 1985); Bonnie J. Fox, "Selling the Mechanized Household: 70 Years of Ads in Ladies' Home Journal," Gender and Society 4 ( MARCH 1990): 25- 40; Erving Goffman, Gender and Advertisements ( New York: Harper & Row, 1979); Gloria Steinem, "Sex, Lies & Advertising," Ms. (July/ AUGUST 1990): 18- 28; Penny Belknap and Wilbert M. Leonard II, "A Conceptual Replication and Extension of Erving Goffman's Study of Gender Advertisements," Sex Roles 25 ( 1991): 103- 118; Gaye Tuchman et al., eds., Hearth and Home: Images of Women in the Mass Media ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1978); Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique ( London: Penguin Books, 1982); Steve Craig, Men, Masculinity and the Media (Newbury Park: SAGE Publications, 1992); Rosalind H. Williams, Dream Worlds: Mass Consumption in Late Nineteenth-Century France ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982); Marjorie Ferguson, Forever Feminine ( London: Heinman Press, 1983); Janice Winship, Inside Women's Magazines ( New York: Pandora Press, 1987); Naomi Wolf, The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women ( New York: Anchor Books, 1991); Jean Kilbourne, "The Child as Sex Object: Images of Children in the Media," Challenging Media Images of Women 3 (Summer 1991): 1-2, 6; and bell hooks, Sisters of the Yam: Black Women and Self-Recovery ( Boston: South End Press, 1993), especially the Preface.
3.
For a discussion of cultural hegemony as theorized by Antonio Gramsci, see T. J. Jackson Lears, "The Concept of Cultural Hegemony: Problems and Possibilities," American Historical Review 90 ( JUNE, 1985): 567- 593. Lears defines cultural hegemony as the "spontaneous consent given by the great masses of the population to the general direction imposed on social life by the dominant fundamental group," p. 568.
4.
Linda K. Kerber, "Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Woman's Place: The Rhetoric of Women's History," The Journal of American History 75 ( JUNE 1988): 17.
5.
The concept of the "private sphere" is also complicated by the fact that many women worked for pay inside the home, by taking in boarders, for example.

-205-

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