Modern Engendering: Critical Feminist Readings in Modern Western Philosophy

By Bat-Ami Bar On | Go to book overview

Contributors
----- Bat-Ami Bar On is associate professor of philosophy and Director of Women's Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton. Her detour into canonical commentary is motivated by a need to configure a relation between feminist philosophy and philosophy. Her primary focus is socio-political and ethical issues and theory, especially as these arise in relation to everyday kinds of violence and abuse. She is working on a book about these issues.
----- Susan Bordo is Joseph C. Georg Professor of Philosophy at LeMoyne College. She is the author of The Flight to Objectivity: Essays on Cartesianism and Culture ( SUNY Press, 1987) and Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and the Body ( U. of California Press, 1993). She is also the co-editor (with Alison Jaggar) of Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing ( Rutgers U. Press, 1989).
----- Lisa Heldke is assistant professor of philosophy at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN. She writes and teaches on pragmatist feminism and on the philosophy of food. Her dissertation, "Coresponsible Inquiry: Objectivity from Dewey to Feminist Epistemology" ( Northwestern University, 1986), was her first attempt to explore the feminist implications of Dewey's epistemology. With Deane Curtin, she is the editor of Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food ( Indiana University Press, 1992).
----- Jane Kneller is assistant professor of philosophy at Grinnell College. She has written on Kant's aesthetics, on the German Enlightenment and early German Romanticism, and is currently editing a volume on Kantian social theory and contemporary issues.
----- Lynda Lange is a Canada Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto-Scarborough. She is co-editor with L. M. G. Clark of The Sexism of Social and Political Theory ( University of Toronto Press, 1979). Her present research concerns the political development of feminist theory, and especially its relation to democratic theory.
----- Wendy Lee-Lampshire completed her Ph.D. in May 1992, specializing in philosophy of mind, language, Wittgenstein and feminist theory and has since taken up a post at Bloomsburg University as assistant professor of philosophy. Her interests revolve around the interstices and connections between philosophy of mind, neurophysiology, biology, artificial

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Engendering: Critical Feminist Readings in Modern Western Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.