Pastorals with a Discourse on Pastoral Poetry:

By Alexander Pope | Go to book overview

WINTER:

THE FOURTH PASTORAL
OR DAPHNE

To the Memory of Mrs. Tempest

LYCIDAS:

THYRSIS, the music of that murm'ring spring
Is not so mournful as the strainsyou sing
.
Nor rivers winding through the vales below,
So sweetly warble, or so smoothly flow
.

Now sleeping flocks on their soft fleeces lie,
5
The moon, serene in glory, mounts the sky,
Whilst silent birds forget their tuneful lays,
Oh sing of Daphne'sfate, and Daphne's praise!

WINTER: This was the poet's favorite Pastoral.

Mrs. Tempest] This Lady was of an ancient family in Yorkshire, and particularly admired by the Author's friend Mr. Walsh, who, having celebrated her in a Pastoral Elegy, desired his friend to do the same, as appears from one of his Letters, dated Sept. 9, 1706. "Your last Eclogue being on the same subject with mine on Mrs. Tempest's death, I should take it very kindly in you to give it a little turn, as if it were to the memory of the same lady." Her death having happened on the night of the great storm in 1703, gave a propriety to this eclogue, which in its general turn alludes to it. The scene of the Pastoral lies in a grove, the time at midnight. P.

-45-

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