Pastorals with a Discourse on Pastoral Poetry:

By Alexander Pope | Go to book overview

PRINTER'S NOTE

Pope, in his last illness, amused himself, amidst the care of his higher concerns, in preparing a corrected and complete edition of his writings; and was even solicitous to prevent any share of the offence they might occasion, from falling on his friend, Mr. Warburton, whom he had engaged to give them to the public.

..."Iown the late encroachments upon my constitution made me willing to see the end of all further care about me or my works. I would rest for the one in a full resignation of m y Being to be disposed of by the Father of all mercy; and for the other (though indeed a trifle, yet a trifle may be some example) I would commit them to the candour of a sensible and reflecting judge, rather than to the malice of every shortsighted and malevolent critic, or inadvertent and censorious reader. And no hand can set them in so good a light." &c. Letter cxx to Mr. Warburton.

The text of the Georgian Press edition of the Pastorals follows carefully, with a few typographic corrections, that of the edition of 1766, "The Works of Alexander Pope Esq. in Nine Volumes, Complete, with his last Corrections, Additions, and Improvements,Together with the Commentary and Notes of his Editor. London, mdcclxvi."

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