Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds

By Steven L. Jacobs | Go to book overview

suspend our intellect nor deny the historical reality of the Shoah: when we engage in prayer. Thus, the alternative understandings of prayer presented in this chapter are an attempt to do both: to suggest to all who continue to struggle with prayer after the Shoah that it is possible to pray, though never again as those in the past prayed; and that the restlessness of the post-Shoah mind and mind set must be given their rightful place in any meaningful discussion of prayer.

The last question that now must be raised is "Why?" Why bother with prayer at all? Why bother to be part of any so-named praying community? Despite the overwhelming impact of the Shoah, the .poetry of the soul" continues to assert itself. Despite our all-tooready willingness to engage in despair, life itself and its singularly unique "moments of beauty" continue to present themselves even to the most affected and afflicted. Short of permanent institutional residence and mental and physical impotence, survivors and their children, scholars, and friends continue to go on with life. Suicide for the vast majority of those addressed in this book is simply not an option. We children of survivors, we Second Generation, are born into a community, primarily of Jews, and wish to remain so. That some among us are no longer comfortable with the historically traditional understandings of faith and religion because of the Shoah comes as no surprise to anyone. That we wish to enter into on-going dialogue with our fellow Jews about God, covenant, prayer, and so forth should be interpreted and understood as our positive response, not to the Shoah itself, but rather to meaningful and creative Jewish religious survival and our determination to enlist others, Jews and Christians, in preventing its repetition.

That said, we turn next to the very essence of the Jewish religious experience: that of halakhah and mitzvot, law and commandments. For this Second Generation thinker, no longer accepting of such as Divinely given, can there be any other interpretation and understanding that accords discipline its rightful and appropriate place within the Jewish panoply of ideas and charts the way Jews can now do their Judaism five decades after the Shoah?


Notes
1.
Significantly, it seems to me, scientific thinkers are beginning to ask religious and theological questions; a number of books in my library bear witness to that fact. On the other hand, however, we religious and theological thinkers are not yet conversant enough with the literature to begin asking appropriate scientific questions. Here is yet another area worthy of further exploration and thought.

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 151

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.