Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds

By Steven L. Jacobs | Go to book overview
Glossary
Aliyah: Immigration to Israel. Literally, a "going up" to the Land of Israel. (Its opposite is yeridah, literally a "going down" from the Land of Israel.)
Ale malei rachamim: "O God, full of compassion." Prayer text included in Jewish funerals, asking Divine blessing and eternal caring upon the deceased.
Antisemitism: Hatred of the Jewish people and the Jewish religious faith, heritage, and tradition. Throughout history, the forms antisemitism have taken have included expulsion, ghettoization, forced religious conversion, denial of civil rights, and extermination-annihilation. (Preferred spelling here is without the hyphen; to use a hyphen is to imply its opposite, that there is such a thing as "Semitism," which is nonexistent.)
Aseret ha-Dibrot: Usually translated as the "Ten Commandments," as found in the Torah in Shemot (Exodus) 20 and Devarim (Deuteronomy) 5. A more accurate translation would be the "Ten Essential Statements," without which no society could endure.
Bar or Bat Mitzvah: Literally, "son" or "daughter of the Commandment." The "coming of age" in the Jewish religious tradition of a boy at age 13 and a girl at age 12 years plus 1 day (girls maturing faster than boys). Usually the ceremony involves the conduct of any or all of a worship service, the reading or chanting selected portions of Scripture, and a speech, possibly a commentary on that Scripture. Usually celebrated with, at times, too elaborate social parties.
Behirah: "Chosenness." The biblical understanding of the children of Israel "chosen" by God for a special purpose, to be "a light unto the nations and a banner unto the peoples," giving evidence by the lives led of a true commitment and following in the ways of God. Over the course of the centuries, this concept has led to misunderstanding between Jews and Christians as well as to

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 151

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.