Latin-American Women Writers: Class, Race, and Gender

By Myriam Yvonne Jehenson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4 Arms and Letters: The Power of the Word

The women discussed in this chapter direct their attention less to male/female relations within patriarchal conventions and more to the difficulty of sustaining any personal relations in the circumstances of political oppression and/or societal hypocrisy. They explore other ways, proceeding from the descriptive level where force is countered with force, where power is simply transferred, to a normative level where love, compassion, and inclusiveness are the standard.


MARTA TRABA

Marta Traba, Latin America's most influential art historian and critic, was born on 25 January 1930 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Traba received her bachelor's degree from the University of Buenos Aires in 1948, won a summer scholarship to study art in Chile, and studied art history at the Sorbonne and the Louvre. Firmly believing that Latin America had its own art heritage, which should be studied, cultivated, and appreciated, she worked tirelessly to establish a museum of modern art in Bogotá, Colombia, where she was professor of art at the university. Her dream was realized in 1962, and she was named the museum's first director. Her crusade for recognition of Latin-American art led to her appointment as director of cultural extension by the university in 1965. Traba was an outspoken critic of local and world politics. In 1967, she was ordered expelled from the country for denouncing the military invasion of the University of Bogotá. The outcry among intellectuals caused the government to rescind the order, but Traba was forced to relinquish her university appointment and to resign as director of the museum. Soon after marrying her second husband, Angel Rama, in 1969, she moved to Montevideo,

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Latin-American Women Writers: Class, Race, and Gender
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • About the Author ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Latin American Women/ Women in Latin America 1
  • Chapter 2 - To Build Bridges 13
  • Chapter 3 - Man's Love... 'tis Woman's Whole Existence 23
  • Chapter 4 - Arms and Letters: the Power of the Word 41
  • Chapter 5 - To Build New Worlds 85
  • Chapter 6 - Indigenista and Testimonio Literature: "Let Me Speak" 119
  • Epilogue 149
  • Notes 155
  • Selected Bibliography 177
  • Index 193
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