Contemporary British Poetry: Essays in Theory and Criticism

By James Acheson; Romana Huk | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER SIX
From Myth into History:
The Later Poetry
of Thom Gunn
and Ted Hughes

Paul Giles

Thom Gunn and Ted Hughes were first linked in the public mind through what Gunn later called the "publishing convenience" of a joint Selected Poems, published by Faber in 1962, "when we were too young and had too little written for a full-scale Selected Poems each." 1 This volume soon became a popular text for English classes in secondary schools, reinforcing the familiar cliché of a composite poet—"Ted Gunn," as Alan Bold described this overly "convenient classification." 2 Gunn, in fact, had first come to prominence slightly earlier than Hughes: his first book of poetry, Fighting Terms, was published in 1954, leading him to be nominated one of five "Movement" writers in the "Spectator" article of October 1954 that invented this label.The Movement writers were welcomed here as harbingers of the changing structure in postwar British society, purveyors of a new middle‐ class spirit of rationalism and common sense, which was seen as a welcome antidote to the obscure, overwrought symbolism of a decadent modernism. 3 For the record, the other writers named by the Spectator were Donald Davie, Kingsley Amis, John Wain, and Iris Murdoch; various others, notably Philip Larkin, became identified with the group at a later stage.From the perspective of forty years later, it is obvious enough that this idea of a "Movement" was a journalistic invention that failed to encompass all the complex strands of the writers it chose to appropriate. "I found I was in it before I knew it existed," said Gunn in 1958, "and I have a certain suspicion that it does not exist."4 Still, this Movement phenomenon, however vague

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary British Poetry: Essays in Theory and Criticism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.