We Have No Leaders: African Americans in the Post-Civil Rights Era

By Robert C. Smith; Ronald W. Walters | Go to book overview

9
Symbolic Politics at High Tide:
Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow Coalition

This book is devoted in good part to the study of the transformation of black politics from protest to systemic political participation. The campaigns of Jesse Jackson for president are emblematic of this transformation, in a sense the symbolic peak of this twenty-year transformation in the nature of the black freedom struggle. Jackson is a fitting embodiment of this process. He began his career as a protégé of Dr. King, the preeminent 1960s protest leader; in the decade of the 1970s he transformed himself into Dr. King's successor as the preeminent race leader and then in the 1980s made an effective transformation from protest and race leader to presidential candidate and party leader. The successes and failures of his campaigns test the limits of post—civil rights era black politics.

The idea of a black running for president is as old as the post—civil rights era. 1 The notion of a black presidential candidacy was one of the reasons for the calling of the National Black Political Convention in 1972. Indeed, the strategy and rainbow symbolism of the 1984 and 1988 campaigns have their origins in the 1972 Gary convention. Jackson was a major actor at Gary, calling for the formation of an independent black political party that would include progressive whites and that would field a candidate in the 1972 election. 2 The idea of a black presidential candidate and/or a black political party was aborted throughout the 1970s as a result of the ideological and factional disputes that eventually led to the convention's collapse. But the point here is that the original idea of a black running for president did not emerge full-blown out of Jackson's mind in 1983. It had been on the black agenda since the end of the civil rights movement. 3

Given that the idea of a black candidacy has been around since 1970, what are the factors that precipitated the Jackson candidacy in 1984? The Reagan administration was an important one. Its overt hostility to civil rights and its regressive social and economic policies threatened to reverse the gains of the 1960s civil rights revolution and retard

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
We Have No Leaders: African Americans in the Post-Civil Rights Era
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 396

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.