The Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Passage of the Law That Ended Racial Segregation

By Robert D. Loevy; Hubert H. Humphrey et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

til all are exhausted and until the leadership has used every strategy . . . to ensure the greatest chance of its success." 69

In the Democratic Policy Committee study, the performance of every member of the Senate in 1964 was tabulated on all cloture votes since the atomic energy amendments of 1954. On the basis of this analysis, 55 senators were considered ready to invoke cloture on H.R. 7152 in the form it passed the House. Thirty-three senators were labeled as "reasonably sure against." This category included the bloc of 19 southern Democrats, all of whom were unquestionably against. 70 Finally, 12 senators were identified as "crucial." 71 This group included nine Republicans and three Democrats, and on their votes was thought to hang the question of cloture.

Summing up, the challenge confronting Mansfield and Humphrey could be understood by realizing that cloture on H.R. 7152 would require the affirmative vote of every senator identified in the Democratic Policy Committee study as "crucial," assuming no favorable votes were cast by the senators rated as "reasonably sure against" and all 100 senators voted.

The magnitude of this task, plus the simple fact that the Senate had never invoked cloture on any measure remotely associated with civil rights, stimulated considerable speculation that a compromise deal with the southern Democrats would be the only way to end the debate. But President Johnson's equally well-known opposition to such a solution, a position also taken by the crucial Republican members of the House, further clouded the outcome of the debate.

Mansfield, Humphrey, and Kuchel, the principal party leaders supporting the bill when the Senate began its debate, knew they faced a stiff test of legislative leadership. The difficulty of their assignment was summed up with this question: Could they control the debate in a manner which permitted senators, both collectively and individually, to exercise independent judgments on the controversial issues without sacrificing the substantive objectives which President Johnson and the House of Representatives considered essential?

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Passage of the Law That Ended Racial Segregation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?