A Question of Class: The Redneck Stereotype in Southern Fiction

By Duane Carr | Go to book overview

9

Ellen Glasgow:
The Dispossessed as Raw Talent

Ellen Glasgow was an advocate of progress and a modern South where reality would tear away fantasy and science would bring economic benefits to the lives of impoverished people. At the same time, her ties to the romance of the Old South were strong, and therein lies the major conflict in her novels. She was never to quite work out a satisfactory compromise.

The dichotomy seems to have been set up at birth. From her mother, whom she describes as "a perfect flower of the Tidewater in Virginia," she inherited a gentility and noblesse oblige, and from her father, "a descendant of Scottish Calvinists," a hard‐ headed perseverance she came to call the "vein of iron" (The Woman Within 139). Thus one part of her looked back on a lost civilization idealized into "heroic legend," the other looked forward to a New South where scientific farming could revolutionize and revitalize a region impoverished by long misuse, a devastating war, and the economic decline that followed.

Because of this, she seems the quintessential southerner, seeking valiantly to hold onto the old while embracing the new, never fully acknowledging that a belief in one might well preclude a belief in the other. "I had grown up in the yet lingering fragrance of the Old South, she writes in A Certain Measure, and I loved its imperishable charm, even when I revolted from its stranglehold on the intellect." She adds:

In the Old South, this inherited culture possessed grace and beauty and the inspiration of gaiety. Yet it was shallow-rooted; for all its charm and goodwill, the way of living depended, not upon its own creative strength, but upon the enforced servitude of an alien race. In the coming industrial conquest, the aristocratic traditions could survive only as an archaic memorial. It was condemned to stand alone because it had been forsaken by time. (12-13)

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Question of Class: The Redneck Stereotype in Southern Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.