Mechanisms of Immigration Control: A Comparative Analysis of European Regulation Policies

By Grete Brochmann; Tomas Hammar | Go to book overview

2
Germany's Immigration Policies
and Politics
Dietrich Thränhardt

The End of the Provisoire and a New Migration Regime

Migration and loss of control stood at the origins of the new Germany. The East Germans fled an oppressive regime and brought it down in a dialectical process of exit,voice,and disloyalty. Since the 1950s, migration to West Germany had endangered the very existence of the Communist regime due to the magnetism of the West German state and society (Thränhardt, 1995: 60). To secure their sphere of influence, the German Democratic Republic (GDR) leaders built the Berlin wall in 1961, a symbol of state control and coercion, which for the following decades was largely recognized as unpleasant but definite proof of Communist Germany´s sovereignty and stabilization. West Germans proclaimed free movement as a cornerstone of freedom and democracy and every refugee coming from East Germany was received as a proof of the superiority of the free world. Clearly, the migration regime reflected the general political situation.

In the détente of the early 1970s, East Germany was acknowledged as a state, but with reservations about citizenship. East Germans leaving could claim West German citizenship. Despite protests, East Germany accepted this special relationship. Beginning in 1976, the Communist regime expelled opponents or let them go, to get rid of the nuclei of turmoil. Moreover, West Germany used its economic power to buy out political prisoners from East Germany and ethnic Germans from Poland, Romania and the Soviet Union. This reduced the totalitarian pressure and made it less dangerous to participate in the opposition in the GDR, as the worst consequence would be imprisonment and subsequent transfer to the West.

Courageous refugees were instrumental in the breakdown of the Communist regime. It came about in the summer of 1989, when the Hungarian borders were opened and tens of thousands took the roads to

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mechanisms of Immigration Control: A Comparative Analysis of European Regulation Policies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Notes on Contributors ix
  • 1 - The Mechanisms of Control 1
  • References *
  • 2 - Germany's Immigration Policies and Politics 29
  • References *
  • 3 - Ideas, Institutions, and Civil Society: on the Limits of Immigration 59
  • References *
  • 4 - Immigration Control without Integration Policy: an Austrian Dilemma 97
  • References *
  • 5 - Migration Control and Minority Policy: the Case of the Netherlands 135
  • References *
  • 6 - Closing the Doors to the Swedish Welfare State 169
  • References *
  • 7 - Redrawing Lines of Control: the Norwegian Welfare State Dilemma 203
  • References *
  • 8 - Planning in the Dark: the Evolution of Italian Immigration Control 233
  • References 258
  • 9 - The Emergence of Migration Control Politics in Hungary 261
  • References *
  • 10 - Controlling Immigration in Europe 297
  • References *
  • Index 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.