Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Defending the American Presidency: Clinton and the Lewinsky Scandal

By Robert Busby | Go to book overview

4
The Starr Investigation

Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr was instrumental in the development of scandal politics in 1998, coordinating the investigation of Clinton's alleged perjury and obstruction of justice during the Jones deposition. Having played a central role in the investigation of the Whitewater matter, and possessing a long-term knowledge of the Clinton White House, the personality of the President, and the role and function of the Independent Counsel, Kenneth Starr held a decisive role in determining the fortunes of the Clinton presidency. His investigation provoked controversy however. A constant stream of criticism emanated from the White House, alongside several questions about the cost, duration, and conduct of his probe into Clinton's discreet liaison. For all the public commentary about Starr's investigation, he held his ground stubbornly, and ensured that a vast amount of evidence was delivered to the House of Representatives in order that it make an informed decision about whether to impeach the President. To many, including those at the White House, it appeared that Starr's motivation was a partisan hatred of the President. His appointment in 1994 had been greeted with some suspicion and his long-term tenure proved a constant distraction for the President.

This chapter considers the nature of the Starr investigation, with a particular focus upon the Starr Reportand the White House response to that particular document. It opens by evaluating the controversies over the nature of Starr's investigation and then studies the White House arguments presented when the Starr Reportwas filed. The need for the White House to counter the charges leveled against the President by Starr was clear. If they were left unattended or unchallenged, then Starr's viewpoint might dominate the platform of debate. Accordingly,

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Defending the American Presidency: Clinton and the Lewinsky Scandal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 255

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.