Defending the American Presidency: Clinton and the Lewinsky Scandal

By Robert Busby | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
See ‘Figure 3-1. 1996 Presidential Election’, Michael Nelson, ‘The Election: Turbulence and Tranquillity in Contemporary American Politics’, in Michael Nelson (ed.), The Elections of 1996 (Washington D.C.: CQ Press, 1997) p. 61.
2
There are several interpretations of the plight faced by the modern presidency and the problems created and endured by the presidential office; see Burt Solomon, ‘Do We Ask Too Much of Presidents?’, National Journal, 18 June 1994, pp. 1390–92.
3
‘19 August 1998. The Ratings: Good News for Networks’, NYTimes.com [http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/081998clinton-ratings.html]
4
‘1 March 1998. Republicans Abandon Restraint on Clinton’, NYTimes.com [http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/030198clinton-repubs.html]
5
‘19 August 1998. The Reaction: Prominent Democrats Are Unhappy With Clinton’, NYTimes.com [http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/081998 clinton-politics.html]

Chapter 1 The Clinton Scandal Epidemic
1
See, ‘Clinton's Latest, Worst Troubles Put His Whole Agenda on Hold’, Congressional Quarterly Weekly, 24 January 1998, pp. 164–5.
2
‘27 January 1998. Hillary Clinton: “This is a battle” ’ CNN.com [http://www. cnn.com/US/9801/27/hillary.today]
3
Theodore Lowi, ‘Foreword’, in Andrei S. Markovits and Mark Silverstein, (eds), The Politics of Scandal: Power and Process in Liberal Democracies (New York: Holmes & Meier, 1988) p. viii.
4
Cited in ‘Watergate's Clearest Lesson: Ten years later, the point remains: Not even a President is above the law’, Time, 14 June 1982, p. 36.
5
‘25 January 1998. Other Presidents Have Been the Talk of the Pillow’, NYTimes.com [http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/012598clinton-history.html]
6
Joseph P. Lash, Eleanor and Franklin (New York: Signet, 1971) pp. 302–3.
7
Cited in Gayle Worland, ‘Scandals Throughout Presidential History’, Washingtonpost.com [http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/ special/clinton/stories/scandalhistory.htm]
8
Denise M. Bostdorff, ‘Clinton's Characteristic Issue Management Style: Caution, Conciliation and Conflict Avoidance in the Case of Gays in the Military’, in Robert E. Denton Jr. and Rachel L. Holloway, The Clinton Presidency: Images, Issues and Communication Strategies (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1996) p. 189.
9
Elizabeth Drew, On The Edge: The Clinton Presidency (New York: Touchstone, 1995) pp. 32–3.

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Defending the American Presidency: Clinton and the Lewinsky Scandal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Exhibits vi
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Clinton Scandal Epidemic 15
  • 2 - The Lewinsky Affair 46
  • 3 - Protecting the President: Damage Limitation and the Lewinsky Scandal 70
  • 4 - The Starr Investigation 117
  • 5 - Impeachment and Trial 137
  • 6 - The Media: Intrigue and Revulsion 170
  • 7 - Public Opinion: Reluctant Observers 187
  • Conclusion 215
  • Notes 224
  • Index 248
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 255

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.