The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha

By Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra; Burton Raffel | Go to book overview

they could not manage without eating and doing all those other natural things — since, really, they were simply men, just as we are — at the same time we need to understand that, spending most of their lives in the woods and fields, without a cook, their most usual meal would have to be simple rustic food, exactly like what you just offered me. Thus, Sancho my friend, don't be displeased by what pleases me. Don't try to make the world all over again, or to change knight errantry."

"I beg your pardon, your grace," said Sancho, "but since I don't know how to read or write, as I've already told you, I've never learned or even thought about the rules of knighthood. From now on I'll make sure there are all sorts of dried fruits in my saddlebags, just for your grace and because you're a knight, and what I'll stock up on for myself, since I'm not one of your profession, is chickens and more solid food like that."

"I haven't told you, Sancho," said Don Quijote, "that knights errant are absolutely obliged to eat only these fruits of which you speak, but simply that such would have to constitute most of their usual meals, augmented by whatever herbs they could find in the fields, about which they were well informed and as to which I too have some learning."

"Knowing about herbs," replied Sancho, "is a good thing, and I wouldn't be surprised if, some day, we'll have use of that knowledge."

At which point he produced what, as he'd said, was still in his saddlebags, and the pair ate their lean, dry meal peacefully and companionably. But since they much wanted to find their night's lodging, they didn't take very long about it. They quickly remounted and hurried to locate an inhabited spot before nightfall, but the sun went down, taking with it their hope of getting what they wanted, just as they arrived at some miserable goatherds' huts, and so they made up their minds to stop there. And it was as upsetting to Sancho, not getting to a town or a village, as it was pleasant to his master to sleep under the open sky, for every time this happened to him he thought himself more and more conclusively a true knight.


Chapter Eleven

— what happened between Don Quijote and the goatherds

The goatherds agreed most cheerfully to put him up for the night. After Sancho had taken care of Rocinante and the donkey (as well as under the circumstances he was able), he was drawn by the fragrance given off by certain pieces of salted goat flesh, boiling away in a big pot on the fire. He would have liked to determine, then and there, if they were ready to be transferred from pot to stomach, but didn't, because just then the goatherds took them off the fire and, spreading some sheepskins on the ground, quickly set up their rustic table and, with great good will, invited both master and servant to share their food with them. Six of them, who were in charge of that flock, sat down on the sheepskins, not without first inviting Don Quijote, in their best country manners, to take a seat on a small wooden feeding trough, which they turned upside down for him. Don Quijote took

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 733

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.