The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha

By Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra; Burton Raffel | Go to book overview

"My God, has your grace forgotten that I'm not a knight, or would you like me to finish vomiting up my guts where I left off last night? Keep your balm for the devils in hell, and let me take care of myself."

And the minute he finished saying this, he began to drink, but discovering with the first swallow that it was water, he broke off and asked Maritornes to fetch him some wine, which she did with great good will, and paid for it herself, for in fact it was said of her that, though she was what she was, she still had a distant resemblance to a Christian.

And then, after Sancho had drunk, he dug his heels into his donkey and, as they were throwing open the gate, he left, well satisfied that he'd paid nothing and stuck to his word, even though he'd had to be ransomed by his usual guarantor, namely, his shoulders. Still, the innkeeper had taken his saddlebags, in payment for what was owed, but Sancho wasn't thinking about anything like that, riding off as hastily as he did. Seeing Sancho go, the innkeeper wanted to bolt and lock the gate, but the blanket‐ tossers wouldn't let him, for they were the kind who, even had Don Quijote been one of the real Knights of the Round Table, wouldn't have cared two cents.


Chapter Eighteen

— which tells of Sancho Panza's conversation with his master,
Don Quijote, and other matters worth recounting

Sancho was so wilted and deeply discouraged, as he rode up alongside his master, that he couldn't hurry his donkey. Seeing which, Don Quijote said to him:

"I have now concluded, my good Sancho, that this castle, or inn, is without any question enchanted, for what otherwise could they be, who so atrociously amused themselves with you, except ghosts and denizens of the other world? And this is corroborated by the fact that, when I reached the courtyard fence, from whence I saw how they played out your sad tragedy, I could not climb it, nor could I get down from Rocinante, so obviously I must have been under a spell, for I swear to you, by my faith as the knight I am, that had I been able to climb, or to dismount, I would have so revenged you that those loafers and rascals would have remembered that joke for the rest of their lives, even though it might have contravened the laws of knighthood, which as I have told you many times do not permit a knight to lift his hand against anyone who is not himself a knight, except in defense of his own life, and under circumstances of great and pressing necessity."

"And I would have revenged myself, too, if I could have," said Sancho, "whether or not I'd been dubbed a knight, but I couldn't. Still, I don't think the people who played that game with me were either ghosts or under any magic spells, as your grace says, but just men of flesh and blood like us, and as I heard when they were tossing me up and down, they all had human names. One of them was called Pedro Martínez, and another was

-90-

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