The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha

By Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra; Burton Raffel | Go to book overview

could be doing this to me — because just see, on the one hand you tell me that our priest and barber are travelling with me, and on the other I can see for myself that I've been locked up in a crate, and I don't need anyone to tell me that mere human powers, which aren't supernatural, wouldn't be strong enough to lock me up like this — so what do you want me to think or say except that I've been enchanted far more powerfully than anything I've read about in all the books that tell the tales of knights errant who've ever been enchanted? So you can rest assured about this idea of yours that those two are who you say they are, because they're as much our priest and barber as I'm a Turk."

"Our Lady protect me!" shouted Sancho, in reply. "How can your grace possibly be so pig-headed and stupid that you don't understand that I'm telling you the plain truth, and there's a lot more malice than magic in this captivity and misfortune of yours? But never mind, I want to prove to you beyond a doubt that you're not enchanted. And if I'm wrong, then tell me, as God may free you from this suffering, and as I may see you in my lady Dulcinea's arms, when you least expect it — ."

"Stop promising me things," said Don Quijote, "and ask your question, because I've already told you I'll answer you right away."

"This is what I want to know," replied Sancho. "And that is, that you tell me, without adding or leaving out anything at all, but just the plain truth, the way we can expect those who are knights, like your grace, to speak, and the way they do in fact speak, given the name of knight errant —."

"I tell you I won't lie about a thing," answered Don Quijote. "Now ask your question, because to tell you the truth, Sancho, I'm getting tired of all these oaths, and vows, and pledges."

"And I can say I'm completely convinced of my master's goodness and truthfulness — so, to get to the point, what I ask, speaking with all due respect, is this: since your grace has been shut up in that crate and, so far as you're concerned, enchanted, have you felt the need and the desire to make what they call, you know, big water or little water?"

"I don't understand this 'big water or little water,' Sancho, so speak more plainly, if you want me to answer you plainly."

"You really can't understand, your grace, what I mean about big water and little water? Little boys all learn that in school. Well, what I'm trying to say is, have you felt like doing what no one can keep from doing?"

"Ah, ah, now I understand you, Sancho! Oh yes, lots of times, and I feel it coming right now. Get me out of this pickle, because it's already pretty messy in here!"


Chapter Forty-Nine

— dealing with Sancho Pancho's perceptive conversation with his master,
Don Quijote

"Ah-ha!" said Sancho. "Now I've got you: this is exactly what I wanted to know, with all my heart and my life! So come on, señor: Can you deny

-324-

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