Before Mark Twain: A Sampler of Old, Old Times on the Mississippi

By John Francis McDermott | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

"Never since St. Louis was a 'place,' never since broadhorns and flatboats hid their diminished heads before the introduction of mighty steam upon the vast tide of the Mississippi, has this city presented so lively an aspect as at the present moment. The expansive Levee is so narrowed by the rising river that the boats stand opposite to the store doors, so near as to present the singular appearance of a contracted street with very queer houses, having tall chimneys all along one side. What is left of the Levee is literally piled up with produce and merchandise. It is with the utmost difficulty that drays can move about, and passengers have enough to do to elbow their way along the sidewalk. All is bustle and activity. The steamer Eclipse, I am told, went off the other day with a freight barge in tow, and the value of the cargo taken down was estimated at the enormous sum of seventy-five thousand dollars! Boats are starting now every day loaded down with produce, and yet the Levee continues heaped with it. Steamers from above report that it will take all the boats in the trade a full two months to bring down the cargoes that are now ready and waiting for them.

"The winter has been very severe ... but the reaction has burst out very suddenly and with singular effect. The town seems to have jumped out of passive slumber into raging excitement. ... Three new hotels are now open.... numbers of fashionable strangers are here, as well as officers of the army and many of the prominent citizens...."

So Matt Field wrote from St. Louis to the New Orleans Picayune on April 25, 1843. 1 Every day the levee was crowded with people, coming and going. A month earlier John James Audubon and his four friends on their way to the Upper Missouri

____________________
1
New Orleans Weekly Picayune, May 8, 1843.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Before Mark Twain: A Sampler of Old, Old Times on the Mississippi
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.