Discourses against Judaizing Christians

By Saint John Chrysostom; Paul W. Harkins | Go to book overview

DISCOURSE VII

I

HAVE YOU HAD ENOUGH [915] of the fight against the Jews? Or do you wish me to take up the same topic today? Even if I have already had much to say on it, I still think you want to hear the same thing again. The man who does not have enough of loving Christ will never have enough of fighting against those who hate Christ. Besides, there is another reason which makes a discourse on this theme necessary. These feasts of theirs are not yet over; some traces still remain.

(2) Their trumpets were a greater outrage than those heard in the theaters; their fasts were more disgraceful than any drunken revel. So, too, the tents which at this moment are pitched among them are no better than the inns where harlots and flute girls ply their trades. 1 Let no one condemn me for the boldness of my words; it is

____________________
1
Trumpets were blown at the great annual feasts of Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles. Here the reference, as in Disc. 1.1.5, is probably to the New Year (Rosh Ha- Shanah) on the first of Tishri (Sept.—Oct.). Chrysostom has compared the synagogue to the theater before. See Disc. 1.2.7 and Introd. III 18. The fasts then would be the Ten Days of Penitence between the New Year and the Day of Atonement. See EJ 15.1001. This period was not a drunken revel except insofar as it is possible to be drunk without wine. See Disc. 8.1.5 where Chrysotom states that the fasting of the Jews is more disgraceful than any drunkenness. The tents refer to the feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot), which fell on the fifteenth of Tishri and lasted a week during which the Jews danced and "made merry before the Lord" (cf. Lv 23.33-43). See Disc. 1.1.5; DB 863-64 and EJ 15.495-501. EJ 6.1195 says that the Monday after Sukkot was a fast day to atone for possible sins committed while in the state of drunkenness and gluttony during the holidays. In Disc. 1.3.1 Chrysostom compares the synagogue to a brothel as well as a theater.

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Discourses against Judaizing Christians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Fathers of the Church *
  • The Fathers of the Church *
  • Discourses against Judaizing Christians *
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Select Bibliography xiii
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Discourses against Judaizing Christians *
  • Introduction xxi
  • Discourse I 1
  • Discourse II 35
  • Discourse III 47
  • Discourse IV 71
  • Discourse V 97
  • Discourse VI 147
  • Discourse VII 177
  • Discourse VIII 205
  • Indices 243
  • Generalindex 245
  • Index of Holy Scripture 273
  • The Fathers of the Church Series 287
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