Ethnicity and Sport in North American History and Culture

By George Eisen; David K. Wiggins | Go to book overview

Contributors

GEORGE EISEN is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He has published numerous articles and books dealing with such topics as the Olympic Games, religion and sport, ethnicity and sport, and the influence of social class on sport participation. His latest book, the highly acclaimed Children and Play in the Holocaust: Games among the Shadows was translated into five languages. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to Estonia where he was assisting in developing an American Studies program.

DAVID K. WIGGINS is Professor and Director of Undergraduate Programs in Health Science at George Mason University. His research has focused primarily on African-American involvement in sport and physical activity. His most recent publications have appeared in the Journal of Sport History, The International Journal of the History of Sport, and the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. He is currently working on an anthology dealing with the history of American sport.

ROBERT KNIGHT BARNEY is a Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Director of the Centre for Olympic Studies at the University of Western Ontario. His research has focused primarily on Olympic history, the German‐ American Turnverein movement, and nineteenth-century baseball. He is a member of the Executive Council for the preservation of the Turnverein Heritage in America and served as President of the North American Society for Sport History.

CARMELO BAZZANO is a Professor in the Department of Human Performance and Physical Fitness at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. An immigrant from Sicily and former boxer and soccer player, Professor

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