Human Rights and Comparative Foreign Policy

By David P. Forsythe | Go to book overview
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Notes
1
Some parties and factions did reject key features of the Indian Constitution. Among communists, there have been parties rejecting the parliamentary path and favouring armed revolution. Some Hindu nationalist and communalist groups have openly rejected the equal rights of Muslims. Secessionist and minority communalist groups have been present. Open support of caste discrimination by political parties has been rare, although tacit support has been more common. Nonetheless, before 1991 parties openly opposing central features of the Indian Constitution did not command more than 20 per cent of popular votes or informal support.
2
Indian Ministry of External Affairs, Foreign Affairs Record, vol. 35, 1989.
3
India Today, 31 March 1994, p. 26.
4
US Department of State, “India Country Report on Human Rights Practices for 1996” (www.state.gov/www/global/human_rights/1996_hrp_report/india.html). Last visited on 16 February 1998.
5
James Ron, “Varying Methods of State Violence,” International Organization 51/2 (1997), 280–281.
6
David P. Forsythe, Human Rights and World Politics (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1989), 11; and Jack Donnelly, “International Human Rights: A Regime Analysis,” International Organization 40/3 (1986), 599–642.
7
Donnelly, “International Human Rights,” op. cit., 602–603.
8
World Health Organization, “The Health Conditions of the Population in Iraq since the Gulf Crisis,” WHO/EHA/96.1 (www.who.ch/programmes/eha/countryr/gulfrep.htm). Last visited on 16 February 1998.
9
Sarah Zaidi and May C. Smith Fawzi, “Health of Baghdad's Children,” The Lancet 346 (2 December 1995), 1485.
10
New York Times, 31 May 1992, p. 8.
11
World Health Organization, “The Health Conditions of the Population in Iraq,” op. cit. A detailed chronology and criticism of the sanctions are contained in Geoff Simons, The Scourging of Iraq: Sanctions, Law, and Natural Justice (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996), 33–104.
12
Guardian, 29 September 1991.
13
Amnesty International, Amnesty International Report 1995 (New York: Amnesty International, 1995), 166.
14
Physicians for Human Rights (gopher://gopher.igc.apc.org:5000/00/int/phr/war/6). Last visited on 16 February 1998.
15
Dennis G. Dalton, Indian Idea of Freedom: Political Thought of Swami Vivekananda, Aurobindo Ghosh, Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore (Gurgaon, Haryana: Academic Press, 1982), 168.
16
Ibid., 169.
17
Ibid., 167.
18
Jack Donnelly, “Human Rights and Human Dignity: An Analytic Critique of NonWestern Conceptions of Human Rights,” American Political Science Review (1982), 76.
19
The most salient construction of the colonial experience is in Jawaharlal Nehru's Discovery of India (Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1960).
20
Dharma Kumar and Meghnad Desai, The Cambridge Economic History of India, Volume 2: c.1757–c.1970 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 528; Ashis Nandy, At the Edge of Psychology (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1980), 4.
21
Nandy, At the Edge of Psychology, op. cit., 4.
22
Paul R. Greenough, Prosperity and Misery in Modern Bengal (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982), 97–98.

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